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MARILYN MONROE

She was a phenomenon: she captured the nation and the world like none before her. No single movie star has since had the effect on men and women that Marilyn still has today. For young male teenagers she was the source, the beginning, the crack in the dam that unleashed a lifetime of frenzied testosterone, short-circuits, and parched throats, while rendering them deaf and blind to anything in the world other than the primordial scream that Marilyn awakened. With only a look she could reach into one's chest and squeeze the heart with her powerful grip, leaving an ache that lasted for days. And countless women the world over have tried to grasp a tiny piece of that power by emulating the famous blonde in any way they could. They wanted what MM had.

Power. Norma Jean was born with it, though did she have any clue as to what lay beneath when she was young? Could she move a pencil across the desk with her thoughts? Did she knowingly or unknowingly tap into The Force and, with a simple look, cause young boys to fight over who would sit next to her in school? What was it that only this one woman embodied that could make grown men forget important appointments just to follow her to some unknown destination? It was as though, with that powerful heart-squeeze of hers, she could pull every man around her down the street with invisible threads. She was the supreme Marionette Master. A small tug on those threads could cause an accelerated heart rate, a stirring of the genitals, a sweaty brow. What woman wouldn't want that same power?

One look at Marilyn could destroy a man's entire day. Nothing else existed. Nothing else mattered. He might as well have gone home to bed to sleep it off because the remaining waking moments were ruined for anything else other than Marilyn. At least that's how I have perceived it, for I never had the fortune to see her in-the-flesh. Regarding an imagined MM sighting, an old friend of mine is fond of saying, "My pacemaker would have gone on overtime. Five minutes with her and it would have taken the undertaker 2 weeks to wipe the grin off my face."

I was eleven when she died but was already under her spell, and I still cannot watch "Some Like It Hot" without feeling that old "heart-squeeze," just like the first time I saw the movie. No, from the grave she yet possesses the Power—The Force—and still can manipulate those gossamer threads from where she lies. And, as time marches on, men and women continue to feel the effect of...

 

 

 


The two top pictures were taken by a prop hand during the filming of the 1960 Twentieth-Century Fox picture "Let's Make Love," starring Marilyn Monroe, Ives Montand, and Gene Kelly, directed by George Cukor and produced by Jerry Wald [roll mouse over thumbnails to see a larger version]. An item of interest is the illustration on the front of the coffee bar in the photograph in the middle. That logo may still be in use today by some catering company, and someone may know the person serving the actors. If you have any information please contact the webmaster.

Since all three pictures were on the same roll of film, it is presumed that the same photographer took the last photograph, but nothing more is known.

 

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